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  1. #1
    Headed to Rehab, Forum Enthusiast
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    Achievements Let's Talk...Happy Anniversary!

    HArtwell Temp/DO levels 7/2/19

    At the River Forks

    _River Forks.JPG

    At the Dam

    _Dam.JPG
    Thanks wkelly, keywest thanked for this post
     

  2. #2
    Catching on every cast, Legend wkelly's Avatar
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    Achievements Posting GuruLet's Talk...Happy Anniversary!I'm Not Alone!
    Thanks Bubba! Actually doesn't look too bad. It's interesting that there's such a large drop in D.O. (~4 ppm) with only a < 10 ft difference in depth-- I guess this is due to the thermocline, which I guess prevents good mixing or something?

  3. #3
    Headed to Rehab, Forum Enthusiast
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    Achievements I'm Not Alone!Happy Anniversary!A Little Bird Told Me
    According to the DNR biologists whom attended the fish kill meeting the other week, the thermocline is where the plankton settles to. This is where the density of the plankton equals that of the water. Zooplankton feed on the phytoplankton. Zooplankton are somewhat mobile but phytoplankton are nonswimming so this is where they fall to. Plankton are relatively short lived and upon death they immediately begin to decompose. Decomposition consumes Oxygen. This is most likely the cause of the decreased oxygen concentration in the lower part of the thermocline. The dying plankton, along with all the other dead organic debris that washes into the lake or is produced in the lake will slowly sink through the water column. As it does it consumes oxygen. This is called BOD (biological oxygen demand). The organic debris that settles on the bottom will also continue to consume oxygen. This is called SOD (sediment oxygen demand). The SOD is why the bottom of the lake is usually always void of oxygen. Oxygen concentrations in the lake are only relatively uniform from top to bottom after the lake has recently turned over. Lake turnover usually happens around February in lake Hartwell. The top of the lake is usually close to saturation. Depending on winds and wave actions, the top part of the lake can sometimes become supersaturated with oxygen.

    If you want to learn more about water quality in Lake Hartwell, refer to this document. https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a161869.pdf

    The water intakes (penstocks) to the 5 generators that produce electricity are located at approximately 100 feet below full pool. They are 24 feet in diameter. It is these penstocks that are responsible for the oxygen depletion in the critical habitat zone come August through October. The result is a fish kill. This will happen every year we have above normal rainfall and will most likely result in smaller fish kills in years of normal rainfall. Sounds promising!!!! Some remediation action is needed. Contact your local representative and your local environmentalist. The CORE will not remediate this on their own. It will take a lawsuit or impending litigation.

    With this said, I will be fishing on Saturday. And if I catch any stripers over 6 lbs, I will be keeping them as there is a very high likelihood the impending fish kill this fall will snuff them out.

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